Music resources for French teachers!

I got a tweet from the fabulous Laura today asking about resources for French music, so I thought I’d share a few of my favorite links!

I do Mercredi Musique in all levels of French (only for the past two years, but it feels way longer). It’s arguably my students’ favorite part of French class, and I like to keep it pretty routine and therefore, low-prep (like, seriously low prep) so we do the following things every Wednesday.

  1. I intro the name of the song, the artist and the genre. Sometimes, we predict what the song might be about (based on the title) but that doesn’t happen very often (mostly because I’m lazy and/or I forget).
  2. We watch the music video. I try to pick songs with school-appropriate videos; if there is a moment or two that is potentially questionable (I’m not about that parent e-mail life) then we have “technical difficulties” during those parts (aka I mute the SmartBoard).
  3. We express our opinions of the song and its video; I provide some helpful nouns and adjectives to that end, so I don’t have to listen to everyone say “c’est intéressant” all the time.
  4. I teach them the chorus; this involves repeating after me line-by-line and then making meaning of the words to get an idea of what the song is about. A bonus to only teaching the chorus is that the selection of songs you can use in class gets way bigger, because any stray swear words are typically in the verses and unless the kids have enough gumption to look up the lyrics and each word’s translation, they won’t know the difference.
  5. They practice the chorus with a partner.
  6. We listen to the song again, and sing the chorus each time it comes up.

My Mercredi Musique slides for the past two years are here and here. To find ideas for songs, I peruse http://www.mcm.fr/top-50 (though a lot are in English), Spotify France, Topito, and Paroles de clip by TV5Monde. Because I want to get my students hooked on French music (and thus, my class) I try to only pick songs that are, in their words, “lit” which as far as I can glean means cool/catchy. There is the rare exception (everyone needs some Edith Piaf from time to time) but I really try to use songs that are mostly upbeat and fun; know your audience, though – sometimes the chill indie songs have been successful, but I try to play to a wide audience.

Enjoy!

*Petite side note: As the school year winds down and throughout the summer as time allows, I will be uploading some of my units and other teaching resources on TpT (frankly, grad school doesn’t pay much and a girl can only eat so much Top Ramen). Just keep an eye out if that’s of interest to you!

La Manie Musicale de Mars 2017

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It’s that time again: March Madness! For the college basketball fan, March is a huge deal of non-stop games that culminate in the college basketball championship at the end of the month. For the world language teacher, it’s a great opportunity to work more authentic music into any and all levels!

This will be my 3rd round of Musical March Madness, and it is my students’ favorite time of year – and that is no exaggeration. We listen to music pretty regularly regardless, but this is a special occasion that everyone looks forward to during the school year. And, to be completely honest? It also gives me a little bit of a break on having to craft 4 different levels of 50-minute lesson plans during one of the hardest months of the year (for me, anyway). I can take the same activities and use them in every level!

Typically I do a 16-song bracket, but as we have testing in March this year, and I will be absent a couple of days this month for various personal-life things, I’ve reduced it to 12 songs. I picked based on titles and artists that my students have enjoyed listening to over the years – however, the majority are not songs that they’ve heard before.

Please bear in mind that I also teach mostly levels 3, 4 and AP and therefore I feel comfortable choosing songs that have more mature themes. Know your clientele and make the choices that are right for you (and them!).

La Manie Musicale de Mars 2017

Soprano – Barman vs Willy William feat Keen’V – On s’endort

Vianney – Je m’en vais vs Fréro Délavega – Mon petit pays

LEJ – Seine Saint Denis Style vs Coeur de Pirate – Ensemble

Louane – Jeune vs Margaux Avril – Lunatique

Christophe Maé – La Parisienne vs Claudio Capeo – Un homme debout

Black M – Je suis chez moi vs Maitre Gims – Ma beauté

I’m excited to see who the winner is!

January: What I Read

When I was younger, I used to read for pleasure all the time. I had, literally, hundreds of books (still do, probably). I’m not sure why, but I got out of the habit of reading for pleasure while I was in college and didn’t really pick it back up again once I hit the workforce. I realized last year that it kind of bummed me out that I wasn’t reading more, since I think it’s a big part of self-care, so I did the 2016 Popsugar reading challenge and read about 20 books on the list of 40. While I didn’t get all the way through the challenge, I really enjoyed having a goal to meet and categories of books to read (like “a book with a blue cover” or “a book that’s 100 years old”) rather than “Read this exact title” because I could tailor the challenge to my tastes. So in December I decided to do the 2017 Popsugar Reading Challenge and I’d really like to make my total more than 50% this time!

Here’s what I read in January, and how I’m counting it for the challenge.

1. 97 Orchard:97orchardcover.jpg An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement by Jane Ziegelman

Challenge category: A book with a subtitle

I’m a big history person (particularly social history, or anything that has to do with real people) and I happened to visit the tenement at 97 Orchard street this summer when I went to New York. I saw this while I was in the gift shop but didn’t buy it, so I decided to pick it up when I saw it at my local library. The book focused less on the actual families than I would have liked (and as it was advertised) and more on the food trends of the demographics to which they belonged. Still, it was interesting to see how people lived (and ate) in turn-of-the-century New York, and how culinary traditions from the “home country” ultimately became our culinary traditions (or have been totally lost since then).

 

2. The Pearlpearl.jpg That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi

Challenge category: A book where the main character is a different ethnicity than you / A story within a story

This book came highly recommended from a friend of mine and has generally favorable reviews on Goodreads but I was decidedly not a fan. I found it poorly written, poorly edited, and had such little connection to the characters or setting that it could have been a book about anyone, anywhere – not the situation of Muslim women in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan. Likewise, for all the fuss they made about Rashima being the descendant of a woman who supposedly played a huge role in the King’s palace, she was there for all of about four chapters and didn’t actually accomplish anything or play any kind of significant role at all. Nevertheless, I finished the book and like I said – it seems many of the people who reviewed it on Goodreads enjoyed it, so you can come to your own conclusions!

veldhiv3. Je vous écris du Vel d’Hiv: Les lettres retrouvées by Karen Taieb (preface by Tatiana DeRosnay)

Challenge category: A book of letters

As I mentioned above, I am a HUGE history buff (in fact, it’s my minor) and one of my areas of specialization during my undergrad was France at war in the 20th century. I was fascinated by the story of La Rafle, and how little there was in terms of documentation – almost nothing was left behind, save for a photograph of a buses full of people parked outside of the former Velodrome d’Hiver in Paris. So that Taieb was able to track down 18 letters, written from inside the Vel d’Hiv, and put together the stories of the people who wrote them is, I think, remarkable. Hard to read, but important and so, so necessary. I think there is an English translation available to any non-Francophones who are interested in reading it.

Read anything good lately?

Top 5 of 2016

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Another year of blogging in the books! I’m sure I’m not the only one who is more than happy to bid farewell to 2016 and who is hoping for a less eventful, more peaceful 2017. This was my most productive year of blogging yet and I have to say, I really enjoy the process. I’ve always enjoyed writing and having an outlet to do so has been very soothing, particularly since my real-life family and friend audience doesn’t always understand the trials, triumphs and tragedies that come with teaching. So thank you for reading! I hope, in some way, I’ve been able to contribute something to the profession this year.

So what did readers like in 2016? It seems my more reflective blog posts were all the rage but for some reason, my post on daily routine/reflexive verbs continues to garner a lot of traffic (I’m not sure why; it’s probably the most boring French topic known to man, other than chores, but I think it’s one many of us feel obligated to teach anyway).

The top 5 posts of 2016

5. La Routine Quotidienne

4. August #authres

3. The Power of the Do-Over

2. A Play on Write, Draw, Pass

1. Don’t Look Back

Gift Guide for the Modern Teacher

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Well, with the passage of (American) Thanksgiving, the gift-giving holiday season is officially upon us! While I really like giving (and receiving) gifts, I’m not always good at picking out gifts for people I love. I know requesting a list tends to take the magic out of surprising a friend or family member, but I always like to make sure I’m getting them something that they’ll actually want and use, not just something that think is cool.

And while I am always grateful to receive gifts and I do believe it’s the thought that counts, I’ve been on the receiving end of about five hundred Eiffel-Tower-shaped ornaments, knickknacks, posters, lotion bottles, you name it – so I think I’m not the only one who appreciates a solid gift recommendation! While it’s not the only part of my identity, being a teacher is certainly a big part of who I am and I really do appreciate when people buy gifts with that in mind; that being said, I think a good gift is one that brings both pleasure and purpose.

Gift giving is always a subjective practice and there is no one-size-fits-all, but if you know a teacher, love a teacher, have a teacher, or are a teacher who simply wants to treat yourself during this holiday season, here are a few of my go-to suggestion that are both fun and useful. Maybe you can even benefit from a few last-minute Cyber Monday sales!

Instant Pot: If you have a little money to spend on the teacher you love, the Instant Pot is like the Crock Pot’s way cooler cousin. It’s a pressure cooker that can cook rice to perfect in five minutes, a whole roast in 1 or 2 hours and countless other meals. It’s definitely on my list this year!

Essential Oil Diffuser: I’m definitely not an essential oil enthusiast, but I have to admit that a little lavender oil in a diffuser goes a long way toward helping me chill out and sleep better.

Stitch Fix gift card: Admit it – after a while, shopping for cute teacher clothes gets a little tedious. I tend to gravitate more toward function than fashion, but black-pants-solid-top-maybe-a-scarf outfit gets a little old. Stitch Fix is a personal styling service that sends five pieces of fun, fashionable clothing (or even accessories) to your home for only a $20 initial styling fee. You can try on the clothes, pick what you want to keep, and mail the rest back in a prepaid USPS bag. The $20 fee is applied to whatever you keep; if you keep all five pieces, you get a 20% discount. (If you don’t want to get a gift card but want to sign up for Stitch Fix, you can do so here). I’ve been using Stitch Fix semi-regularly for about four years and I LOVE it.

Blue Apron gift card: Who likes grocery shopping? Not me. Blue Apron sends awesome recipe ingredients straight to your home. Help your favorite teacher out and get them a box of healthy food so they can avoid the school cafeteria!

The Happiness Planner: This is more than just a regular planner – in addition to the usual calendar and to-do list, the Happiness Planner has room for you to note down each day’s goals, meals, exercise routine, what went well about each day and what your hopes for the next day are. At the end of each week, they also offer a “weekly reflection” space with thoughtful writing prompts.

Lush bath set: I am a LUSH junkie and cannot recommend their bath products enough. Their products are vegan, cruelty-free, and use all-natural ingredients. Great for relaxing in the bath at the end of a long week!

Lunch Crock: The Lunch Crock is an electric mini-crock pot that lets you have a nice, hot lunch every day! I love to put leftovers in it and plug it in about an hour before lunch starts; it’s so awesome to have a warm lunch during the cold winter months.

Anthropologie Candles : These smell awesome and the jars they come in are super cute and can be repurposed for small items around your home!

Nespresso: This is a pricier item and it’s one that I don’t have yet but I seriously covet. My friends in Paris have one and I know I’m going to sound like a crazy coffee snob but deal with it because this machine is LIGHT YEARS better than the Keurig. The coffee is of far superior quality, it makes an awesome espresso or regular coffee, and certain machines will froth milk for you for lattés and cappuccinos. And the pods are recyclable, which the Keurig pods are not. Your machine is also guaranteed by Nespresso – if it ever needs to be serviced, they will send you a replacement machine while you wait for yours to get fixed. How cool is that?

Contigo travel coffee mugs: Simple, but the BEST travel coffee mugs I have ever encountered and a must for the on-the-go teacher who likes a hot beverage. My coffee or tea stays hot (not lukewarm, HOT) literally for hours in these mugs. Can’t beat it!

Happy shopping, and happy holidays! Also please note, there are no affiliate links here – just recommendations of products that I really enjoy!

 

 

Mystery Student

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In the past 24 hours, the subject of “how do you get kids speaking in the TL?” has come up twice; once with a colleague and then again on last night’s edition of #langchat.

There are definitely a lot of strategies that one could use – I’ve written before about my love for Class Dojo and after a brief hiatus from the system I brought it back just to see how my kids would respond and sure enough; they’re back to wanting to speak more and more French.

But then, it comes time to set up an interpersonal speaking activity in-class. Those are always frustrating for me because I can never monitor everyone at once and am never certain that everyone has participated in the way that I would like them to. Enter the “mystery student” tactic which is very simple and has worked well in all of my classes so far (though I wouldn’t use it every day or for every interpersonal activity just to keep it novel).

  1. I announce to the class that I am going to randomly select a student. I will not tell them in advance who the student is. Since I have every kid’s name written on an individual 3×5 notecard, I can choose randomly from the stack.
  2. After I choose the mystery student, I announce that I am only going to be listening to THAT student, to see if he or she remains in the TL for the entirety of the activity. I still mill about the room so they don’t know who the mystery student is, but my ear is always trained on that one kid.
  3. If the mystery student is successful, everyone will receive points (no more than 5) for the activity. His or her name is then revealed and everyone thanks him or her.
  4. If the mystery student is NOT successful, then no points are given (just nul, not 0/5) and the mystery student remains a mystery. Better luck next time!

Give it a try! Let me know how it works in your classroom!

My Favorite Spook-tacular Resources for French Class

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Most days, I can say that I really don’t regret my decision to study French instead of Spanish. I think the French language and culture have a lot to offer students! That is…until the end of October rolls around, my students are squirrely, Halloween is approaching and Spanish teachers have a great cultural and linguistic opportunity in Day of the Dead and French teachers get…la Toussaint. Womp womp.

I’ve done lessons on la Toussaint before and while it’s been a great educational opportunity, it’s not exactly the most engaging subject as Toussaint tends to be eclipsed by the two-week vacation that all French students get in honor of the holiday (which no one really celebrates beyond laying mums on a loved one’s grave).

My French 3 kids have JUST started a unit on Legends and the Supernatural (previously done at the end of last year with my level 4 kids), so they’ll be seeing most of these resources but they really could be adapted to (almost) any level. Our grammar focus for all of first semester in level 3 is passe compose and imparfait, so this unit lends itself very well to narrating stories in the past!

Nonetheless, if you’re looking for a way to use the language to honor this spooky season, consider some of these resources!

MovieTalk

Alma (used in conjunction with this article)

Dirt Devil commercial 

Vampire’s Crown

The Black Hole

Video/Listening Resources

Créatures Fantastiques: Le Loup-Garou du Québec

Créatures Fantastiques: Le Windigo

A la découverte des catacombes avec Donia 10 ans

The Michel Ocelot film Les contes de la nuit

Story Time: Experience Paranormal

Le Conte des trois frères (Harry Potter)

Reading Resources

Most of my reading resources for this unit are self-created Embedded Readings of the following stories:

Le Nain Rouge de Detroit (try as I might, I cannot find a document that is already in French, thus I created it myself based on the details here)

La Peau de chagrin by Balzac (far too long/difficult to read in class; embedded version with the highlights is the way to go)!

Barbe Bleue by Perrault (I choose this one as it is particularly scary/gory for a fairy tale!)

Les Lavandières de la nuit

Article: J’irai dormir dans les catacombes!

Et voilà! Hopefully these resources will help carry you and your students through the spooky  Halloween season (and help take the sting out of not having a calavera to decorate or an ofrenda to build)!